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froidsolaire:

Portrait of a prisoner in the Mountjoy Prison, Dublin, 1857.
Jul 22, 2014 / 6 notes

froidsolaire:

Portrait of a prisoner in the Mountjoy Prison, Dublin, 1857.

Jul 22, 2014 / 26 notes
‘I like this, Boz and Moz, like a double act. He’s got these very blue eyes and quite softly spoken. I was very impressed.’ - bozboorer
Jul 19, 2014 / 80 notes

‘I like this, Boz and Moz, like a double act. He’s got these very blue eyes and quite softly spoken. I was very impressed.’ - bozboorer

Jul 19, 2014 / 18 notes

I was bored 
In a fjord 
I despise the heart and soul of Scandinavia 
Let the people burn 
Let their children cry and die in blind asylums

But then you came along 
And you held out your hand 
And I fell in love with you and Scandinavia

I kiss the soil 
I hug the soil 
I eat the soil 
And I praise the God who made you

Stab me in your own time in Scandinavia 
Unprotesting I’ll die in Scandinavia

Pinned to a crime 
In Trondheim 
I despise each syllable in Scandinavia 
Let the people burn 
It’s their turn 
Let their children cry and die in blind asylums

But then you came along 
And you held out your hand 
And I fell in love with you and Scandinavia

I kiss the soil 
I hug the soil 
I eat the soil 
And I praise the God who made you

Stab me in your own time in Scandinavia 
I ‘d be so happy to die in Scandinavia 

Jul 19, 2014 / 243 notes

17 July 2014

Elaine Stritch dies

Elaine was my friend for a while. She was, of course, a demented genius - in loveable ways.
Can we appreciate the people who are around us right now? The answer, of course, is No, for we are all pathetic human beings.

It takes death for us to say aloud: thank you for everything, Elaine Stritch.

Morrissey
Switzerland, 2014.

Brendan Behan’s laughter ringsfor what he had or hadn’t donefor he knew then as I know nowThat for each and every one of us We all lose, rich or poor we all lose
- Morrissey, Mountjoy
Jul 17, 2014 / 15 notes

Brendan Behan’s laughter rings
for what he had or hadn’t done
for he knew then as I know now
That for each and every one of us 
We all lose, rich or poor we all lose

- Morrissey, Mountjoy

Jul 17, 2014 / 28 notes
Jul 17, 2014 / 113 notes
Jul 17, 2014 / 51 notes
Jul 17, 2014 / 2 notes
Jul 17, 2014 / 92 notes

"I went to see A-ha in America and I really liked… I really liked their records. But when I saw them, and it was just really this constant deafening squeal, not even a respectable scream, it was actually an indecent squeal, which completely drowned out the musicians and threw them off their tracks ‘cos they seemed totally embarrassed by all these, you know, screaming girls. I thought: well, no. I wouldn’t really like that.” - Morrissey interview, 1987.

Jul 16, 2014 / 22 notes
Jul 16, 2014 / 32 notes

Art-hounds look like nothing
so Art-hounds write something
And those that do are judged by those who tried 
And found they couldn’t do

Art-hounds see the Greek Ideal 
and gaze on what they’ll never feel 
The pitiless revenge of those without friends 
the pitiless, the pitiless revenge

Art-hounds know what’s around 
Because they’ve seen it somewhere written down 
And everything they’ve seen on the moving screen 
Helps them fill up the page

In European museums 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
In European museums 
Will i see you?

My life is opera 
My life is opera 
My life is opera 
My life is opera

Art-hounds, in a restaurant 
They bring along their loving aunt 
But when they can’t find a table for their fat aunt Mabel 
They stamp their feet and cry

Art-hounds, in a restaurant 
They bring along their loving aunt 
But when they can’t find a table for their fat aunt Mabel 
They stamp their feet and cry

In European hushed museums 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
In European hushed museums 
Will I see you?

My life is opera 
My life is opera 
My life is opera 
My life is opera

Art-hounds, very funny 
Very witty, but very lonely 
And below the belt is shrivelled and small 
It functions only as a word

Art-hounds, very funny 
Very witty, but very lonely 
And below the belt is shrivelled and small 
It knows a thousand woes

In European hushed museums 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
Will I see you? 
In European hushed museums 
Will I see you?

If you cannot stand this fake world 
If you cannot stand this fake world 
Take my hand 
If you cannot stand this fake world 

If you cannot stand this fake world 
If you cannot stand this fake world 
Take my hand 
If you cannot stand this fake world 

I take sixteen pills to send me to sleep 
And sixteen pills to shake me awake 
What does it mean? 
What does it mean? 
What does it mean? 
What does it mean? 
What does it mean?

Jul 16, 2014 / 4 notes

The Auld Triangle" is a song whose first public appearance was in the play The Quare Fellow by Brendan Behan. The song was rumoured to have been written by Brendan’s brother Dominic Behan, but Dominic never credited the song to himself on any recordings he made of it, and Brendan never attributed it to anyone but himself. Other rumours suggest it was a prison song to which a Behan added verses, but the fact that Dominic never credits himself with writing the song suggests that the true authorship is at least not his.

lucian freud and brendan behan in front of the mansion house in dublin, august 1952 by daniel farson.
Jul 16, 2014 / 88 notes

lucian freud and brendan behan in front of the mansion house in dublin, august 1952 by daniel farson.