Moz

The Latest

http://www.vertelife.com/
Apr 2, 2014 / 14 notes
I was walking through a park quite recently and suddenly a little girl ran past me - I suppose she was about six - and she was screaming; she was crying as she was running through the trees, and it was just so awful. It was probably not dreadfully serious, but I could imagine she just wanted to die and leave the earth…That’s why I could never be a parent. I could never witness all those pains and the awfulness and loneliness and bleakness again. Parents just can’t help at all. In fact, there’s such a gulf between parents and small children it’s ridiulous the system works at all, it’s practically unnatural.
Morrissey in the June 14, 1986 issue of Sounds
Mar 20, 2014 / 93 notes
I do, but it’s quite fatalistic and running out rapidly. I often feel I don’t want to live much longer and again, this will incite guffaws and gasps because it’s such a strong thing to say, but if I’m allowed to be quite honest about it, I don’t want to live much longer. There are certain things that enlighten life but there’s such a price to pay. I do feel I’d be disappointed if I got to fifty, yes, it would show a lack of resolve or something
Mar 17, 2014 / 129 notes
Mar 9, 2014 / 7 notes

MOST ALL SMITHS/MOZ SONGS ON FYM AWAITING YOUR REBLOGGERY

By simply typing in the title of the song you’re looking for after http://fuckyeahmoz.tumblr.com/tagged/ (no dashes/underscores/proper grammar necessary) you should be led to it, if there’s a song that’s not posted, notify and it will be added.

Feb 23, 2014 / 9 notes
Feb 13, 2014 / 41 notes

Morrissey 2014 US tour dates

May 7 San Jose CA City National Civic Auditorium
May 10 Los Angeles CA Los Angeles Sports Arena
May 13 El Paso TX Plaza Theater
May 14 Albuquerque NM Sunshine Theater
May 16 Salt Lake City UT Kingsbury Hall
May 17 Denver CO Ellie Caulkins Opera House
May 19 Lincoln NE Rococo Theatre
May 20 Lawrence KS Liberty Hall
May 22 Dallas TX Majestic Theatre
May 24 Austin TX Austin Music Hall
May 25 Beaumont TX Julie Rogers Theatre
May 27 Memphis TN Orpheum Theatre
May 28 Nashville TN Ryman Auditorium
May 30 St Petersburg FL Mahaffey Theater
May 31 Miami FL Knight Concert Hall
June 4 Atlanta GA Cobb Energy Center
June 6 Atlantic City NJ Revel Ovation Hall
June 7 Boston MA Boston Opera House
June 10 Baltimore MD Meyerhoff Symphony Hall
June 13 Chicago IL Civic Opera House
June 14 Flint MI James Whiting Auditorium
June 16 Lewiston NY Artpark Main Stage Theater
June 17 Wilmington DE Grand Opera House
June 19 Hershey PA Hershey Theatre
June 21 New York NY Barclays Center Arena

MORRISSEY ON MARC
I can’t cleverly theorize about Marc; I just loved him, and any judgement of him ultimately sways to a favourable conclusion. But how can it be twenty-one years since I bought my first T.Rex record? After two decades of constant listening I love the songs even more, tho’, admittedly, my personal collection thinned out with advent of Gloria’s blanket caterwauling - the voice that signalled the end of the adventure. Like ‘classical’ music, pop will endure precisely because of artists like Marc. I cried to certain songs before even knowing the words. My first-ever concert was, obviously, T.Rex at Belle Vue in Manchester in 1972. I spent the night dreaming and watching, permission to fantasize at last. Marc’s indeterminate gender (pre-Bowie) excited me because it annoyed so many. The next day I seemed to have a whole new way of thinking about everything, suddenly living in my own personal experience. A Sunday newspaper article was headlined ‘Bolan: A Weird Kid With No Friends’ and everything was truly clinched. I couldn’t actually imagine Notting Hill at all.A few months later I saw Bowie perform to three hundred people and the big media squabble began. Of course, Marc lost. He lost in the way that pop pioneers always do. The price you pay for being first is that the world as a whole is not always quite ready. When it finally is, you just might be slightly weary, and there’s always someone else revving up behind. In the final analysis, Marc and Bowie deserve equal billing, a lifetime away from the Glam-Slade pettiness. Marc was too intellectual to really make it in America, and I’m glad that he didn’t. His lyrical language was truly only graspable in the cosmic imagination, and consequently he is never considered to be classic British pop writer in the way that, for instance, Ray Davies always is. Interestingly, a Kinks’ B-side in 1969 called ‘King Kong' has Davies performing a shameless mimic of Marc. Even odder, this B-side was reissued in 1972 as an A-side at a time when 'Rexmania' was at full throttle. My indispensables are 'Prophets, Seers and Sages’, ‘My People Were Fair' and 'T.Rex', with 'Metal Guru' as the moment of complete perfection. Marc seemed to age quickly - but under severe public scrutiny, who wouldn't? And, more precisely, who doesn't age anyway?MORRISSEY
October 1991
Feb 5, 2014 / 27 notes

MORRISSEY ON MARC

I can’t cleverly theorize about Marc; I just loved him, and any judgement of him ultimately sways to a favourable conclusion. But how can it be twenty-one years since I bought my first T.Rex record? After two decades of constant listening I love the songs even more, tho’, admittedly, my personal collection thinned out with advent of Gloria’s blanket caterwauling - the voice that signalled the end of the adventure. Like ‘classical’ music, pop will endure precisely because of artists like Marc. I cried to certain songs before even knowing the words. My first-ever concert was, obviously, T.Rex at Belle Vue in Manchester in 1972. I spent the night dreaming and watching, permission to fantasize at last. Marc’s indeterminate gender (pre-Bowie) excited me because it annoyed so many. The next day I seemed to have a whole new way of thinking about everything, suddenly living in my own personal experience. A Sunday newspaper article was headlined ‘Bolan: A Weird Kid With No Friends’ and everything was truly clinched. I couldn’t actually imagine Notting Hill at all.

A few months later I saw Bowie perform to three hundred people and the big media squabble began. Of course, Marc lost. He lost in the way that pop pioneers always do. The price you pay for being first is that the world as a whole is not always quite ready. When it finally is, you just might be slightly weary, and there’s always someone else revving up behind. In the final analysis, Marc and Bowie deserve equal billing, a lifetime away from the Glam-Slade pettiness. 

Marc was too intellectual to really make it in America, and I’m glad that he didn’t. His lyrical language was truly only graspable in the cosmic imagination, and consequently he is never considered to be classic British pop writer in the way that, for instance, Ray Davies always is. Interestingly, a Kinks’ B-side in 1969 called ‘King Kong' has Davies performing a shameless mimic of Marc. Even odder, this B-side was reissued in 1972 as an A-side at a time when 'Rexmania' was at full throttle. My indispensables are 'Prophets, Seers and Sages’, ‘My People Were Fair' and 'T.Rex', with 'Metal Guru' as the moment of complete perfection. Marc seemed to age quickly - but under severe public scrutiny, who wouldn't? And, more precisely, who doesn't age anyway?

MORRISSEY

October 1991

Jan 16, 2014 / 56 notes
My own name is by now synonymous with the word ‘miserable’ in the press, so Johnny putters with ‘misery’ and playfully arrives at ‘misery mozzery’, which truncates to Moz, and I am classified ever after. I had originally decided to use only my surname because I couldn’t think of anyone else in music that had done so - although, of course, many had been known by just one name, but it hadn’t been their surname. Only classical composers were known by just their surnames, and this suited my mudlark temperament quite nicely.
Morrissey, Autobiography
Nov 24, 2013 / 266 notes
For once I have my family. The songs halt at times as fights break out in the room, and smoke rises amongst the rings. Hairpins scream and suddenly it’s a risky business, but the more the red flag waves the more the steam box sweats. Snazzy and spiffy boys point to me, sticky hands squeeze any part of me, and my bluff is called. Dare I take one on? The fire-eater within me leaps out, and I belong nowhere except over the line. Sex is advertised yet withheld – go on, make my day. It is gritty prison-cell sex, and I am shaking with courage. Outside, much later, no one is going home. Fresno streets are blocked by the spunky and the nervy Moz-posse, turned out in black and white or expertly battered denim. There are no Caucasian faces – which is a remarkable answer to those dap snappy London music editors, each boxed up in Bow, who would have me hanged as racist for daring to sing about racism.
The new Morrissey audience is not white – not here, at least – and they are the frenzied flipside of the Smiths’ pale woolgatherers. These new V-men will go to the wall, or the mat, heavy sluggers with fat lips. Do you get the audience that you deserve? I sincerely hope so. Did you see the slugfest out front? Did you see the scrappers in the foyer? Yes, and love them I do, with noble heart. They were alight, too, at El Paso, where we had played on September 2nd and 3rd. Every runaway and throwaway crammed inside as if waiting for a call to war. El Paso’s heavy artillery of players and beefed-up drifters amongst the Juarez boychicks and the butch bitch diesel dykes. The rug-munchers rule, and I’d lay down my life for the lost boys of El Paso – the sad shootists and pack-a-rods. Meanwhile, back in England, they still write Heaven Knows He’s Miserable Now and call me an ex-Smith (for who would know me otherwise?). My new Latino hearts are lost on the know-alls, those self-appointed fusspots and the pernickety chickenshits. I smile at the thought of a Smiths reunion, for I’ve got everything now.
Morrissey, Autobiography
Nov 10, 2013 / 25 notes
"For the release of a live Dolls CD/DVD from the Festival Hall, I glue together raw art for the front of each disc. I had found a photograph from the early 1960s of a female model with a freshly blown bubble passing her face. I tilt the picture sideways so that she looks as if possibly lying on the floor – a little tight and tipsy after four too many egg nogs during a night of Mickey Finished buffoonery on Hans Place. I love the final effect, and I whisk it off to David Johansen who … doesn’t like it.
‘It’s too gay!’ he complains (this from a man who had spent his entire life impersonating Simone Signoret). The artwork is reluctantly accepted, but the back and inner designs are slapdash Bleecker Bob’s rock ’n roll, as if to redress the cloistered-nun aura of my front dabblings.” - Morrissey, Autobiography
Nov 9, 2013 / 16 notes

"For the release of a live Dolls CD/DVD from the Festival Hall, I glue together raw art for the front of each disc. I had found a photograph from the early 1960s of a female model with a freshly blown bubble passing her face. I tilt the picture sideways so that she looks as if possibly lying on the floor – a little tight and tipsy after four too many egg nogs during a night of Mickey Finished buffoonery on Hans Place. I love the final effect, and I whisk it off to David Johansen who … doesn’t like it.

‘It’s too gay!’ he complains (this from a man who had spent his entire life impersonating Simone Signoret). The artwork is reluctantly accepted, but the back and inner designs are slapdash Bleecker Bob’s rock ’n roll, as if to redress the cloistered-nun aura of my front dabblings.” - Morrissey, Autobiography
Nov 6, 2013 / 413 notes

"I am photographed for Creem magazine with my head resting on Jake’s exposed belly.

'Do you know what you're doing?' asks new manager Arnold Stiefel.

'No?' I say in a small voice.

'Well, that's a very intimate shot.'

'Oh?' I say, baffled.

A man doesn’t rest his head on another man’s stomach,’ Arnold goes on.

'No?' I answer, all adrift on the cruel sea.”

- Morrissey, Autobiography

Oct 11, 2013 / 18 notes

Tony Clayton-Lea: MORRISSEY Q&A

This interview took place early June, 1991, backstage at Dublin’s National Stadium, several hours before Morrissey went on stage (the support acts were the Would Be’s) in support of his Kill Uncle album. To my knowledge, it is one of perhaps many (or very few, even?) ‘lost’ Morrissey interviews, as it has never shown up as part of the research for any Smiths/Morrissey book I’ve read in over 20 years.

It doesn’t exist any more, but back in 1991, In Dublin was a niche, often very good publication of reasonable credibility; I was the magazine’s Music Editor, and obtained the Morrissey interview through his then record label, EMI (whose then press officer, incidentally, refused point blank to give Morrissey’s one-and-only-one face-to-face print interview to any other Irish publication). The photos accompanying the original article were taken by Conor Horgan, then a respected Dublin-based photographer, and now an even more highly regarded photographer and filmmaker. (Conor says he has the images “lying about somewhere”, so the accompanying images here are not his.) In an attempt to contextualise Morrissey, the article subhead reads: “He is the missing link between Charles Hawtrey and Billy Fury…” (I can’t recall writing that, but I might have…)

Note to younger readers: the words ‘top’, ‘of’, ‘the’ and ‘pops’ are mentioned somewhere down the page. Ask your parents. Note to younger media types: the word ‘typewriter’ appears just when you least expect it.

+++++

TCL: DO YOU HAVE A PROBLEM ABOUT YOUR TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE BRITISH PRESS? M: No… I’m sure there’s unfairness in all quarters. I simply look forward to the misquotes. They misquote me most of the time, which is a terrible strain on the brain, but I think it happens to most people.

BUT DON’T ALL JOURNALISTS NOWADAYS TAPE THE INTERVIEWS? I generally think that when these people go home, they’re very tired and they just fast-forward. It’s a lack of attention and a lack of dedication to their job. Maybe they find misquotes more interesting than natural quotes. The only bugbear, shall we say, that I find about misquotes is that they never make you more interesting than you are. They always make you seem slightly more silly.

IS MORRISSEY TOO FAMILIAR A SIGHT IN THE BRITISH MEDIA? I very rarely give interviews, yet I’m much discussed. I know the general temperament of pop within England is that once you have your five years, they’re bored, they’re sick of your face, regardless of who you are. But I accept that. I also think that they assume you reach a certain level where you don’t need them or you’re rich enough to not possibly care about making records anymore. It’s inverted snobbery, really. At the same time, the magazines that repeatedly condemn me repeatedly ask me for interviews. Indeed, several magazines have so kindly put me on their cover in order to say Morrissey’s career has ended, but if they really believe my career had ended they would never have dreamt of putting me on their cover.

IT SOUNDS AS IF YOU HAVE A ‘FAME’ ATTITUDE… Well, it varies. I’m an obsessively private person, so I do as little as possible, which is why I don’t have management and so forth. If I had management, I would be cajoled into doing much more. As I said, I don’t do too many interviews and I don’t really appear on television, so it isn’t important to me to become the most known face on the universe. I find if I couldn’t, as it were, retreat – if I was forced to be constantly, repeatedly public – then I couldn’t take it for more than, oh, three hours.

HOW HAVE YOU CHANGED SINCE YOUR PRE-FAME SMITHS’ DAYS? Well, I now look very old, as you’ve noticed. Otherwise, I’m just the same potty character – you seem to agree with that quite readily and quite quickly! Oh, look, I wouldn’t have it any other way – I’ve got no intentions of being any other person.

IS UNWANTED FAME A NECESSARY EVIL, CONSIDERING YOUR CHOICE OF LIFESTYLE? I wouldn’t say a necessary evil. Most of the time, I don’t find myself doing anything I wouldn’t want to do. And that’s something that I actually had to work at, because initially when you begin you’re so eager and so naïve. You want to do everything and please everybody. But when I arrived at the understanding that I did not have to be that way it was a great relief. Mind you, I have been banned by Top of the Pops, which I don’t think has happened in the entire history of the programme. I refused three invitations, which is not really allowed. It’s very petulant of them, but I think – certainly in England – that the British pop establishment is so… Well, they need you to need them, and if you don’t need them, if you’re self-reliant in any way… And that absolutely applies to the music press; the press giveth and the press taketh away. If they feel for a second that it doesn’t really apply to you, they get very angry.

WHAT ARE YOUR VIEWS ON THE INTERVIEW PROCESS? YOU APPEAR NOT TO LIKE IT. I’m very rarely interviewed and almost always cross-examined, so that’s one point. The second point is that I’m almost always asked the same questions, mysteriously enough. It’s very difficult for me to come across a writer who wants to ask me something new or different. The false intimacy of an interview situation is troubling, because being interviewed in any sense, in any aspect of human life, is odd and unnatural. But I cope quite well.

DO YOU FIND YOURSELF TO BE MISINTERPRETED OR MISUNDERSTOOD? Yes, yes. I think more than that is the constant stream of assumptions and deliberate lies and fabrications that occur. You know – ‘Morrissey was here last night doing that and nobody wanted his autograph, and then he went there and he was very unhappy because everybody ignored him.’ I constantly come across these things and I find it very hurtful. I said to a journalist once, ‘why did you write that? You knew it wasn’t true, a complete fabrication.’ And he said, ‘it sells newspapers’. I think that’s the prevailing attitude, and about that I can do nothing. Unfortunately, large amounts of people actually believe what they read in the music papers. It’s so easy for the music press to concoct any quote, put it in inverted commas and it’s an official statement. I find if you sound like you’re heavily disturbed by this situation, then they instantly assume they’ve got you. That they’re upsetting you and their name is on your lips every day. Which is not the case.

DO YOU THINK IT’S JUSTIFIABLE THAT YOU HAVE A REPUTATION FOR BEING ONE OF THE GREAT WITTY, PERTINENT POP INTERVIEWEES? Hhhmmm… Yes, I think that would be quite correct. When I’m interviewed and don’t fulfill any of those expectations the journalists say I’m off form, I’ve become dull, I don’t live up to the reputation that races ahead of me – all of those things. The only unfair aspect, of course, is that I can’t write my views upon that journalist, mainly because nobody’s interested. Yes, it would be interesting if the tables were slightly reversed.

BUT YOU COULD DO THAT – YOU HAVE A BACKGROUND IN JOURNALISM, DON’T YOU? It’s a tatty one…

DO YOU MISS THE SUPPOSED CREATIVE SECURITY OF THE SMITHS? No, not at all. I think what I’ve done since then has been hugely underrated and what other ex-Smiths have done has been dramatically overrated. So… There you go!

DOES IT BURDEN YOU THAT A LARGE NUMBER OF YOUR FANS WOULD LIKE YOU TO REWRITE/RECREATE THE SMITHS? No, because I understand the reality of the issue. People always want what no longer exists, and if The Smiths still existed then people would, perhaps, be less interested than they are now. If I was knocked over tomorrow by a milk float and died, people would herald everything I’d done in a solo capacity in a stronger way than they do The Smiths. There’s a certain re-evaluation that happens when a group or an artist no longer exists that is so obvious to spot. And with The Smiths and the quite natural belief that ‘oh, that was great and isn’t it sad that this is still happening and that Morrissey doesn’t have Johnny Marr…’ Well, I mean, I find that rather pathetic.

DO YOU THINK THAT YOU’RE REVERED BY YOUR FANS? It would be too pompous if I said yes.

AND TOO HUMBLE IF YOU SAID NO? So I’m trapped, really. Next question!

ARE YOU ANALYTICAL ENOUGH A PERSON TO CHART YOUR OWN CREATIVE SUCCESSES AND FAILURES? Yes I am. I feel enormously objective. I feel I’m my strongest critic; nobody can tell me anything I’m not aware of. But they do, much to my extreme personal boredom.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BLEAKEST MOMENTS IN THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS? I think they have occurred with certain journalists that have conducted pleasant, comfortable and supportive interviews, yet the journalist – and friend – has gone back to their typewriter and turned into a terribly nasty character. I don’t mind if I have interviews with writers who are honest and nasty with me, but I don’t like it when they’re nice to me, yet what emerges in print is unreadable and savage. These have been the bleakest moments.

DO DEPRESSING MOODS COME EASILY TO YOU? I find that I have a lot of moods that people consider to be depressing, let’s put it that way. To me, though, I don’t deliberately want to depress anybody.

A PERCEIVED OPINION OF YOU IS THAT YOU ARE AN UNHAPPY PERSON – TRUE OR FALSE? I am unhappy many times, most of the time, but most people are. They just don’t, won’t or can’t admit it. I think that most people who make records are quite straightforward and simple characters. Those few who are not straightforward are instantly over-judged, and if they don’t make ‘Boom-Bang-A-Bang’-type records, or at least simple emotions, then they have to repeatedly explain why they’re not mundane and not tedious. The reason, perhaps, why I’m called unhappy or depressed is because there is a herd element to pop journalism. Whatever the leaders say everybody else follows. When things snowball and you find that you have your tags, I don’t think it would matter what course I would take for the next five years in music. I would still always be the most depressing person you’ve ever put an ear to.

IS YOUR IMAGE IN A SEXUAL SENSE IMPORTANT TO YOU? I wasn’t aware that I had an image, so the rest of the question I therefore cannot answer.

ARE YOU NOT, THOUGH, FOR SOME PEOPLE, AN OBVIOUS OBJECT OF DESIRE? A lot of people tell me I am that to them – it’s usually by letter – but you know, I also think there’s some strange bedazzlement about becoming a minor public figure, that anybody who becomes remotely famous tends to have somebody, somewhere, who wants to sleep with them. I don’t know why that happens.

IN MOST INTERVIEWS, YOU’RE ALWAYS QUITE VAGUE ABOUT YOUR SEXUAL PREFERENCES. WHY? I don’t really have any, to be honest. I mean, I never ever have relationships. And I almost think that is surely enough to say. If I say any more it becomes uncomfortable to the reader.

WHY WOULD IT BE? I don’t know. It’s just slightly squirmy, isn’t it, to discuss the fact of relationship and sexual preferences. I never do unless I’m asked about it, but I have to say I do mind talking about it. Are people interested?

WHAT ARE THE MOST POSITIVE ASPECTS OF YOUR LIFE? That I can make the records I want to make. I don’t honestly think that a lot of recording artists can say that. But I think I’m only allowed to do that because I’m not going to be promoted, anyway. Leave the poor boy with his illusions. Or delusions.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO LIVE OUT YOUR DAYS IN RURAL IRELAND? I did once upon a time, but suddenly I’m beginning to feel that I’d quite like to have a very noisy apartment in an obnoxiously loud and raucous city. I’ve no idea why. Maybe I’ll be a wasting mess in the Chelsea Hotel. We all have our aspirations.

Helen Goode - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Goode_Family
Oct 3, 2013 / 1 note
Aug 4, 2013 / 114 notes

Do you know who I am? I’m like a Morrissey with some strings