meat is murder

The Latest

Oct 5, 2014 / 2,757 notes
Well, I wonder
Do you hear me when you sleep?
I hoarsely cry

Well, I wonder
Do you see me when we pass?
I half-die

Please, keep me in mind
Please, keep me in mind

Gasping, but somehow still alive
This is the fierce last stand of all I am
Gasping, dying, but somehow still alive
This is the final stand of all I am

Please, keep me in mind

Well, I wonder
Please, keep me in mind
Oh, keep me in mind
Keep me in mind

(via novia-en-una-coma)

sugar-spun-brad:

Spotted this on the way to work.
Jul 4, 2014 / 61 notes

sugar-spun-brad:

Spotted this on the way to work.

Jun 21, 2014 / 8 notes
Jun 14, 2014 / 50 notes

"There was a story today in the british newspapers about a slaughter truck on the way to the abattoir full of pigs and one of the pigs climbed to the top, squeezed out the window, climbed on top of the truck, the car behind filmed everything, then the pig hung on the side and then jumped off the truck, landed on the freeway, motorway, highway and then of course human beings being what they are they brought the pig back, brought it to the abattoir and they slit its throat in the name of, in the name of the human race." Morrissey, before singing Meat Is Murder at Boston Opera House, 6/7/14

jesciexvx:

"It means I’d like to be your underwear." On June 14, 1985 #BillyBragg opened for The #Smiths’ #MeatIsMurder tour at the #BostonOperaHouse. You said "Thank you, all you troublemakers." and nearly 30 years later here you are and here we are so sing us our favorite song, nobody loves us, bored-again atheists. "I smile at the thought of a Smiths reunion, for I’ve got everything now" …yes, now as then. #moz (at Boston Opera House)
Jun 7, 2014 / 20 notes

jesciexvx:

"It means I’d like to be your underwear." On June 14, 1985 #BillyBragg opened for The #Smiths’ #MeatIsMurder tour at the #BostonOperaHouse. You said "Thank you, all you troublemakers." and nearly 30 years later here you are and here we are so sing us our favorite song, nobody loves us, bored-again atheists. "I smile at the thought of a Smiths reunion, for I’ve got everything now" …yes, now as then. #moz (at Boston Opera House)

Jun 5, 2014 / 1 note
homeschoolparents:

it is death for no reason, and death for no reason is murder
May 29, 2014 / 62 notes

homeschoolparents:

it is death for no reason, and death for no reason is murder

schismvigilxvx:

Go Vegan Stay Vegan
www.facebook.com/bloodtightapparel
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Mar 28, 2014 / 64 notes
schismvigilxvx:

http://herbivoreclothing.com/

CLOSER COMES THE SCREAMING KNIFE
Mar 28, 2014 / 181 notes

schismvigilxvx:

http://herbivoreclothing.com/

CLOSER COMES THE SCREAMING KNIFE

Mar 26, 2014 / 182 notes
reading3313:

5. Meat Is Murder (The Smiths) - Joe Pernice [Continuum] [Amazon]
It would be remarkable if any book in the series manages to contain fewer words about the album than this one. Joe Pernice describes the book as fiction, but it seems more like somewhat fictional autobiography. Somewhat fictional, autobiographical, teenage memoir.
Framed by the adult protagonist, hungover and returning from playing a gig in London, having an urge to listen to Meat Is Murder and plunging into a flashback that lasts for the rest of the book, the narrative is short on plot, tension and purpose. Characters are introduced and then disappear again, which is maybe fitting for the self-obsession of a teenage narrator but it’s a bit boring to read. There’s a group suicide, and then a running suicide joke between the narrator and his best friend. There’s girls, especially one, and the cachet of being in a band in terms of the social order, and a drift towards getting a band together. The conclusion is just where the book stops, adding up to a big so-what - more disappointing for having set up startling, bold fragments like “I was dying in Catholic school. It was spring and all anyone wanted to do was fuck.” and then meandering out of the clarity into mush again.
Writing a straight take on The Smiths and the album’s process would likely involve big, joyless stretches of having to deal with things like Morrissey and the album title - the worst thing ever, and I’ve been vegetarian since I was a self-righteous ten year old - so it’s a good cue for experimentation, finding another approach that deals with the best aspect of the album: the songs.
Music comes into the story as part of teenage life, and obviously, the anglophiles are set apart from the classic rock majority, and hearing imports and knowing about bands has its own kind of currency. A few paragraphs on a friend’s home-dubbed tapes and the abbreviated labels with no tracklists have a gorgeous sense of possibility that could have carried the book - this is The Smiths filtered through being a kid in Massachusetts, growing up in one place but listening to music from somewhere else and not knowing much about it or, say, being aware of the spectre of Thatcher in the background - and yet the payback is just getting a tracklisting later.
Pernice avoids describing how the music sounded or what the lyrics meant to the narrator, beyond skimming the surface. Instead, there’s the generalised minutiae of a life that may or may not be fictional, mentioning an album but with so little specificity that it could be swapped out for another with barely more than find-and-replace. As much as I appreciate the breadth of the approaches within the series, the only curiosity I have after reading this is whether it initially began with greater promise.
—
By the way, there’s @reading3313, if you’d like notifications of new posts, knowing what’s coming up next week and any miscellaneous business. Also, as well as Twitter and the usual Tumblr methods, I’d welcome any corrections, disagreement or comments by email.
Mar 23, 2014 / 20 notes

reading3313:

5. Meat Is Murder (The Smiths) - Joe Pernice [Continuum] [Amazon]

It would be remarkable if any book in the series manages to contain fewer words about the album than this one. Joe Pernice describes the book as fiction, but it seems more like somewhat fictional autobiography. Somewhat fictional, autobiographical, teenage memoir.

Framed by the adult protagonist, hungover and returning from playing a gig in London, having an urge to listen to Meat Is Murder and plunging into a flashback that lasts for the rest of the book, the narrative is short on plot, tension and purpose. Characters are introduced and then disappear again, which is maybe fitting for the self-obsession of a teenage narrator but it’s a bit boring to read. There’s a group suicide, and then a running suicide joke between the narrator and his best friend. There’s girls, especially one, and the cachet of being in a band in terms of the social order, and a drift towards getting a band together. The conclusion is just where the book stops, adding up to a big so-what - more disappointing for having set up startling, bold fragments like “I was dying in Catholic school. It was spring and all anyone wanted to do was fuck.” and then meandering out of the clarity into mush again.

Writing a straight take on The Smiths and the album’s process would likely involve big, joyless stretches of having to deal with things like Morrissey and the album title - the worst thing ever, and I’ve been vegetarian since I was a self-righteous ten year old - so it’s a good cue for experimentation, finding another approach that deals with the best aspect of the album: the songs.

Music comes into the story as part of teenage life, and obviously, the anglophiles are set apart from the classic rock majority, and hearing imports and knowing about bands has its own kind of currency. A few paragraphs on a friend’s home-dubbed tapes and the abbreviated labels with no tracklists have a gorgeous sense of possibility that could have carried the book - this is The Smiths filtered through being a kid in Massachusetts, growing up in one place but listening to music from somewhere else and not knowing much about it or, say, being aware of the spectre of Thatcher in the background - and yet the payback is just getting a tracklisting later.

Pernice avoids describing how the music sounded or what the lyrics meant to the narrator, beyond skimming the surface. Instead, there’s the generalised minutiae of a life that may or may not be fictional, mentioning an album but with so little specificity that it could be swapped out for another with barely more than find-and-replace. As much as I appreciate the breadth of the approaches within the series, the only curiosity I have after reading this is whether it initially began with greater promise.

By the way, there’s @reading3313, if you’d like notifications of new posts, knowing what’s coming up next week and any miscellaneous business. Also, as well as Twitter and the usual Tumblr methods, I’d welcome any corrections, disagreement or comments by email.

Mar 23, 2014 / 7 notes

Oh, I’m fading, I don’t stand a chance
And meat is murder and I don’t even dance
Something is still worrying me tonight

And oh, I’m falling and nothings working out
And what comes out from my mouth is nothing to worry to about
'Cause everything sounds miserable tonight

I haven’t said too much, have I?
There are things you should keep to yourself
I haven’t said too much, have I?
There are things you should keep to yourself

I haven’t said too much, have I?
There are things you should keep to yourself

The Smiths (1984) - Joe Dallesandro, cropped from a still from the 1968 film ‘Flesh’, directed by Paul Morrissey and produced by Andy Warhol.
Meat is Murder (1985) - A Photograph of Marine Corporal Michael Wynn, taken in 1967 during the Vietnam War. The original writing on the helmet read “Make war not love”.
The Queen is Dead (1986) - Alain Delon, cropped from a still from the 1964 film ‘L’Insoumis’ directed by Alain Cavalier.
Strangeways, Here We Come (1987) - A cropped photograph of Richard Davalos’ face taken from a photograph of himself and James Dean on the set of the 1955 film ‘East of Eden’ directed by Elia Kazan.
Feb 10, 2014 / 852 notes

The Smiths (1984) - Joe Dallesandro, cropped from a still from the 1968 film ‘Flesh’, directed by Paul Morrissey and produced by Andy Warhol.

Meat is Murder (1985) - A Photograph of Marine Corporal Michael Wynn, taken in 1967 during the Vietnam War. The original writing on the helmet read “Make war not love”.

The Queen is Dead (1986) - Alain Delon, cropped from a still from the 1964 film ‘L’Insoumis’ directed by Alain Cavalier.

Strangeways, Here We Come (1987) - A cropped photograph of Richard Davalos’ face taken from a photograph of himself and James Dean on the set of the 1955 film ‘East of Eden’ directed by Elia Kazan.

veronikagreen: Meat is Murder (2013)
"La crueldad hacia los animales tiene tantos matices como víctimas, desde la caza deportiva hasta el abandono de mascotas, pasando por la explotación comercial y la experimentación científica; sin olvidar claro, el insano entretenimiento de las corridas de toros, peleas de animales y los poco habitables pero tan visitados zoológicos".
¡YA BASTA! Di NO al maltrato animal.,
Jan 22, 2014 / 6 notes

veronikagreen: Meat is Murder (2013)

"La crueldad hacia los animales tiene tantos matices como víctimas, desde la caza deportiva hasta el abandono de mascotas, pasando por la explotación comercial y la experimentación científica; sin olvidar claro, el insano entretenimiento de las corridas de toros, peleas de animales y los poco habitables pero tan visitados zoológicos".

¡YA BASTA! Di NO al maltrato animal.,

"Animals are my friends…and I don’t eat my friends" - George Bernard Shaw
Buy the shirt at Farm Animal Rights Movement.
Jan 22, 2014 / 4,131 notes